Marines

Photo Information

CAMP JOHNSON, N.C. -- Newly graduated students from the Basic Distribution Management Specialist Course and their instructors stand for a group photo outside of the school house here Nov. 18. A new school opened its doors here and graduated its first class of 19 students Nov. 18. Camp Johnson is now the new home for students going through the Basic Distribution Management Specialist Course, otherwise known as the Traffic Management School. The school was formerly located at Fort Eustis, Va., but was moved here so the students could train and interact with other students in related fields such as supply and embarkation. (Official U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brandon R. Holgersen)

Photo by Lance Cpl. Brandon R. Holgersen

Traffic Management School moves to Camp Lejeune

18 Nov 2005 | Lance Cpl. Brandon R. Holgersen

A new school opened its doors here and graduated its first class of 19 students Nov. 18.

Camp Johnson is now the new home for students going through the Basic Distribution Management Specialist Course, otherwise known as the Traffic Management School. The school was formerly located at Fort Eustis, Va., but was moved here so the students could train and interact with other students in related fields such as supply and embarkation.

“I think it’s absolutely great,” said Lt. Col. Stephen J. Gabri, the commanding officer of the school. “We have a chance to integrate communities and put a better Marine out to the operating forces.”

The school is now part of the Marine Corps Combat Service Support Schools here, which include the Combat Water Survival School, Financial Management and the Supply School.

“[Marine Corps Combat Service Support Schools] welcomed us with open arms when we moved here,” said Chief Warrant Officer Christopher Douglas, the officer in charge of the school.

The war on terrorism was the reasoning behind the move of the school, because transportation, embarkation and supply Marines work very closely in Iraq. Also, getting supplies and Marine where they need to be is essential to the war effort, according to Douglas. 

“In Iraq, everyone is working in unison, and we can train the same way here,” said Douglas.

The move also allowed the school to improve its curriculum and fine tune the class to what different transportation office’s around the Marine Corps need from their Marines right out of school, according to Douglas.

The move of the school also made it possible to teach some important material in all the schools so students are better prepared when they enter the fleet, according to Douglas. One of the things taught in each of the three schools is radio frequency identification, which is used to track equipment and supplies in Iraq. This allows commanders to track where their supplies are for their troops.

The school’s location also helps students who are waiting for the next class to start. The students can be sent to Transportation Management Offices on Camp Lejeune to get on-the-job training while they wait to start class instead of doing menial chores.