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U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Zoey Proffitt, a military working dog handler assigned to Security Company, Headquarters & Support Battalion, and military working dog Ddrago pay their respects in remembrance of the fallen heroes and victims of the events on Sept. 11, 2001 at the 9/11 Memorial in the Lejeune Memorial Gardens on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Sept. 11, 2020. The 9/11 Memorial includes a beam from the Twin Towers, presented by police and firefighters of New York in honor of the first troops deployed in the Global War on Terror from the base.
The 9/11 Memorial stands as a visual reminder of that fateful day at the Lejeune Memorial Gardens, Jacksonville, North Carolina, Sept. 1, 2020. This year marks the 19th anniversary of Patriots Day, which honors the nearly 3,000 American citizens, civil servants, and first responders whose lives were taken as a result of the terrorist attacks that took place on Sept. 11, 2001. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
The 9/11 Memorial stands as a visual reminder of that fateful day at the Lejeune Memorial Gardens, Jacksonville, North Carolina, Sept. 1, 2020. This year marks the 19th anniversary of Patriots Day, which honors the nearly 3,000 American citizens, civil servants, and first responders whose lives were taken as a result of the terrorist attacks that took place on Sept. 11, 2001. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
The 9/11 Memorial stands as a visual reminder of that fateful day at the Lejeune Memorial Gardens, Jacksonville, North Carolina, Sept. 1, 2020. This year marks the 19th anniversary of Patriots Day, which honors the nearly 3,000 American citizens, civil servants, and first responders whose lives were taken as a result of the terrorist attacks that took place on Sept. 11, 2001. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
The 9/11 Memorial stands as a visual reminder of that fateful day at the Lejeune Memorial Gardens, Jacksonville, North Carolina, Sept. 1, 2020. This year marks the 19th anniversary of Patriots Day, which honors the nearly 3,000 American citizens, civil servants, and first responders whose lives were taken as a result of the terrorist attacks that took place on Sept. 11, 2001. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
U.S. Marine Corps 1st Sgt. Esperanza Fuentes, first sergeant, Bravo Company, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations East-Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, poses in front of the Bravo Company barracks on Sept. 3, 2020. On Sept. 11, 2001, Fuentes was a Lance Cpl. Stationed at Camp Pendleton, California. That day the question on everyone’s minds was “are we deploying?” The answer, yes, would be one of the many things that led her to where she is now.  This year marks the 19th anniversary of Patriots Day, which honors the nearly 3,000 American citizens, civil servants, and first responders whose lives were taken as a result of the terrorist attacks that took place on Sept. 11, 2001.  (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Brenden D. McDaniel, commanding officer, Bravo Company, Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations East-Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, poses in front of the Bravo Company barracks on Sept. 3, 2020. On Sept. 11, 2001, McDaniel was a freshman at Concordia College, although he had no plans to join the military at the time, he did see his father, who was active duty Air Force, deploy multiple times because of the terrorist attacks that day. This year marks the 19th anniversary of Patriots Day, which honors the nearly 3,000 American citizens, civil servants, and first responders whose lives were taken as a result of the terrorist attacks that took place on Sept. 11, 2001. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
U.S. Marines with 2nd Marine Logistics Group attending the Corporal’s Leadership School on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune visit the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 to conduct Marine Corps recruit training, paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of United States Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christian Ayers)
The Montford Point Marine Sculpture that represents the Montford Point Marines; the angle of incline represents the uphill struggle for equality, stands at the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 to conduct Marine Corps recruit training, paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christian Ayers)
U.S. Marines with 2nd Marine Logistics Group attending the Corporal’s Leadership School on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune read the Montford Point Marine Sculpture while visiting the Montford Point Marines Memorial, symbolizing the approximately 20,000 African-Americans that went through Marine Corps boot camp at Montford Point, in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training, paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christian Ayers)
U.S. Marines with 2nd Marine Logistics Group attending the Corporal’s Leadership School on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune visit the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training, paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christian Ayers)
U.S. Marines with 2nd Marine Logistics Group attending the Corporal’s Leadership School on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune visit the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training, paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of United States Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christian Ayers)
U.S. Marines with 2nd Marine Logistics Group attending the Corporal’s Leadership School on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune visit the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training, paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of United States Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christian Ayers)
The Montford Point Marine Sculpture that signifies the Montford Point Marines’ transition to infantry men from their assigned duties as ammunition suppliers and other support roles, stands at the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training, paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christian Ayers)
A wall of stars representing the approximately 20,000 African-Americans that went through Marine Corps boot camp at Montford Point stands at the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. The wall honors the Montoford Point Marines whose dedicated service to the Marine Corps influenced acceptance and diversity in the armed forces. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
A wall of stars representing the approximately 20,000 African-Americans that went through Marine Corps boot camp at Montford Point stands at the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug. 26, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training and paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
Houston Shinal, the previous national monument director for the National Montford Point Marine Association, conducts an interview about the Montford Point Marines at the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug 17, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training and paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
Houston Shinal, the previous national monument director for the National Montford Point Marine Association, conducts an interview about the Montford Point Marines at the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug 17, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training and paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
Retired U.S. Marine Corps Col. Grover Lewis III, commanding officer of Camp Johnson from 2005 to 2007, speaks about the Marines of Montford Point at the Montford Point Marines Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, Aug 17, 2020. This year marks the 78th anniversary of when the first African-American recruits arrived on Montford Point in 1942 for Marine Corps recruit training and paving the way for approximately 20,000 African-Americans over the next 7 years to earn the title of Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez)
The Charge by Sodexo mobile app officially launched to users Aug. 24, 2020, and features geo-location or installation name and mess hall number to view local menus from specialty bars, caloric intake information, nutrition facts and feedback. The free mobile app is available on the Google Play Store and Apple App Store. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Ginnie Lee)